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New Jersey anesthesiologist suspended for malpractice

| Jun 19, 2012 | Medical Malpractice |

When Cherry Hill residents have to undergo a surgical procedure, most often they are confident in the doctor’s skills. The vast majority of doctors are entirely capable of completing the surgery to which they are assigned, but what happens when the doctor is not qualified? This is where medical malpractice suits come in.

Recently, an anesthesiologist in New Jersey had his license suspended by the state Board of Medical Examiners. The suspension occurred because the doctor repeatedly put patients at serious risk by performing surgeries without the appropriate training or education.

This was not his first suspension, either. Back in 2003, he had his license suspended for six months for failing to reveal that he had been convicted of negligent manslaughter. The incident that led to that conviction occurred in London in 2001, when he sedated a woman who later suffered cardiac arrest, resulting in her death.

The current order alleges that the anesthesiologist lacks the appropriate surgical expertise or training to perform complex surgeries. The most recent decision to suspend his license passed on an 11-1 vote after he treated six patients without proper training. One of these treatments ended with a woman needing corrective surgery due to an infection she developed after a botched lumbar fusion.

In its decision, the Board of Medical Examiners cited the doctor’s failure to follow a previous order as one of the reasons for suspending his license. The prior order had allowed him to perform only minor procedures and administer anesthesia, as long as he worked with a board-certified surgeon. The order also required him to modify the website of his practice, which represented him as a spinal surgeon.

It was clear that the doctor did not follow these orders, and unfortunately, another patient was injured as a result.

Source: nj.com, “State suspends license of N.J. doctor for performing spinal surgery without proper training,” Susan K. Livio, June 14, 2012

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