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What evidence is worth collecting after a car accident?

On Behalf of | Dec 3, 2021 | Car Accidents |

Seeking medical attention ranks among the first and most important things to do after a car accident. Getting away from traffic and to a safe location is also essential, but many people lose focus on what to do. A crash on a New Jersey road may occur unexpectedly and leave the victims in shock. Regardless, the accident might result in substantial medical bills and lost wages. So, victims could benefit from following critical steps after a collision. Gathering evidence for an insurance claim or lawsuit would be one such responsibility.

Compiling the evidence

Contacting the police could make the situation more manageable. Tempers flare after accidents, and a responding police officer may help calm the situation. Law enforcement personnel would write a police report, and the document could become evidence in any proceedings. A detailed police report might be more thorough than notes written by an accident victim.

That said, an accident victim may help their cause by taking pertinent notes about the crash. Memories fade, so using a smartphone’s voice dictation or recording function might record details that would otherwise be forgotten. Using the phone’s camera to take pictures of the accident scene helps with collecting more evidence. Photo and video documentation may present an undeniable picture of how much damage a liable party inflicted.

Additional basic points about evidence

Getting the name, contact information, and insurance details from the other driver is critical. A license plate number and vehicle description could help the police track the person down if the driver flees.

If anyone witnessed the crash, collecting witness information seems advisable. Witness testimony could work in a victim’s favor in a personal injury lawsuit.

Medical records may establish the losses someone faces. More importantly, visiting the emergency room might uncover a severe injury the victim didn’t know was present.

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