As it may already be known to construction workers and their families, construction is a dangerous industry to work in. Just how dangerous? In 2009, of the 3.3 million nonfatal injuries and illnesses reported in 2009 to the Center for Disease Control, more than nine percent were experienced by construction workers.

Of the reports, it was overwhelmingly heavily focused on fall-type injuries. Fall injuries are often preventable, if employees are properly trained and are given access to the proper safety equipment. Falls accounted for 22 percent of all types of injuries reported by construction workers in the same year. Falls often occur on scaffolding or other heights.

A close second to falls is another type of gravity-related injury and that’s falling objects. Falling objects can easily be dislodged from above and strike those workers who are below. Construction workers often work with heavy machinery. These machines are extremely powerful and without property training or the safety precautions, they can cause serious injury to those that are at the wrong place, at the wrong time. Workers’ compensation is available for those who are unable to work due to injury or illness.

If you or a loved one has been injured or have fallen ill related to work, you might have questions about what to do next. It really depends on the nature of your injury. Sometimes workers’ compensation is appropriate, but other times further steps need be taken. Seeking the assistance of an experienced attorney can help determine the best course of action for you and your family.